THE MISSILES OF OCTOBER

Even though America had been concerned about the rise of Soviet communism under the tyrannical rule of Joseph Stalin during pre-WWII years, the United States, albeit a bit late in the game, fought alongside Russia as allies against the Axis powers during the WWII years. United States foreign policy regarding Russia and communism had been one of containment, keeping Russia from influencing or being involved in global affairs as much as possible. Following WWII, distrust between the two nations continued to grow. Russia’s post-war expansion into Eastern Europe at a break-neck pace contributed to America’s concerns that Russia was out to control the world. America’s response was to engage in building up its armed forces, its weapons, and continuing efforts to keep Russia from expanding its influence. A strategy of “long-term, patient but firm, vigilant containment” evolved which formed the nucleus of United States policies towards Russia for decades. In 1945 George Orwell coined the term “Cold War” in an essay called “You and the Atomic Bomb.” The name took hold and stuck as the definitive term describing this period of America’s relationships with Russia. In 1947 the House Un-American Activities Committee held hearings detailing the evolution of communism in the United States. It was alive and well, and continues to this day under the guise of “progressivism,” with the CPUSA flourishing in many areas of the United States. In June of 1950 the first military action related to the Cold War took place when the Russian-backed North Korean People’s Army invaded western-friendly South Korea, giving rise to the fears that this was the first step taken by Russia to take over the world. President Truman sent American troops to Korea in

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THE MISSILES OF OCTOBER

Page 1

Even though America had been concerned about the rise of Soviet communism under the tyrannical rule of Joseph Stalin during pre-WWII years, the United States, albeit a bit late in the game, fought alongside Russia as allies against the Axis powers during the WWII years. United States foreign policy regarding Russia and communism had been one of containment, keeping Russia from influencing or being involved in global affairs as much as possible. Following WWII, distrust between the two nations continued to grow. Russia’s post-war expansion into Eastern Europe at a break-neck pace contributed to America’s concerns that Russia was out to control the world. America’s response was to engage in building up its armed forces, its weapons, and continuing efforts to keep Russia from expanding its influence. A strategy of “long-term, patient but firm, vigilant containment” evolved which formed the nucleus of United States policies towards Russia for decades. In 1945 George Orwell coined the term “Cold War” in an essay called “You and the Atomic Bomb.” The name took hold and stuck as the definitive term describing this period of America’s relationships with Russia. In 1947 the House Un-American Activities Committee held hearings detailing the evolution of communism in the United States. It was alive and well, and continues to this day under the guise of “progressivism,” with the CPUSA flourishing in many areas of the United States. In June of 1950 the first military action related to the Cold War took place when the Russian-backed North Korean People’s Army invaded western-friendly South Korea, giving rise to the fears that this was the first step taken by Russia to take over the world. President Truman sent American troops to Korea in
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